Earth Day Was and Is a Call to Action

Clean Air. Clean Water. The Environmental Protection Agency.

These are part of the heritage of Earth Day. Government at the Federal level setting regulation that protects individuals from the impact of (usually) larger entities such as corporations or government itself. Clean air and water are not idle concerns. But they are not simply the responsibility of the federal government.

We need to stop allowing science to be discredited by those who have a fiscal interest in defeating the facts. One of the terrific things about the scientific community is that a "consensus" is not reached until a study has been duplicated by other scientists. One man, woman or group can't be a definitive voice on his or her own.

The science on climate change, BPA and several other issues that impact trillions of lives is definitive. We can continue to ignore the facts on these issues, but we should be fully aware that we do so defiantly and with an utter disregard for the lives of those who depend on us both now and in the future. Just because we are lazy, afraid of change, or afraid of losses in our stock portfolios doesn't mean we get to pretend we are powerless or ignorant.

Walmart has taken tremendous steps to "greening" its business--and not altogether altruistically. Walmart discovered that pursuing this course was good, profitable business. New policies reduced overhead. The same policies improved public perception of the company (which at one point it needed), but those perceptions were not the driving influence for the changes the company went to great pains to make.

If we stop resisting the inevitable and instead embrace the changes we need to make to be truly responsible in our actions each of us has the potential to create new "gains" for ourselves through these changes. "Green" behavior really doesn't require consumption, so you don't have to spend money. You can if you want. You might really want to in order to take advantage of some of the tax breaks you can get currently. But lots of things that are typical of relatively well-to-do folks with Internet connections can be a no-cost change. I'm terrible about leaving lights on all over the place. The trickle-down effect of that is water and fossil fuel consumption by the power company that supplies my piece of the grid. In the plus column, I got a tax credit for upgrading my windows.

What I've really got to stop, however, is being a coward about supporting the science. When other people talk about climate change like its a hoax, I've got to stop letting that stand. The data is there. The evidence is visible and horrific. It's time to stand up on my own two feet and roar.
The Big Recycle

The Big Recycle

Language for Design, Part I

Language for Design, Part I