Backyard Bird Count Events

Backyard Bird Count Events

To begin, I'll give you the boring details. Below is a list of species observed during two observation times today. 

Checklist:

Sharp-shinned Hawk

- 1,

Crow - 5,

Mourning Dove

- 15, Eastern Screech-Owl - 1,

Red-bellied Woodpecker

- 1,

Eastern Phoebe

- 1,

Carolina Chickadee

- 2,

Tufted Titmouse

- 2,

White-breasted Nuthatch

- 2,

Eastern Bluebird

- 5,

Hermit Thrush

- 1, American Robin - 12,

European Starling

- 1,

Eastern Towhee

- 1,

Song Sparrow

- 2,

White-throated Sparrow

 (pictured left) - 2,

Northern Cardinal

- 2,

House Finch

- 2, and

American Goldfinch

 (pictured below right) - 4.

The Robins were the first event of the day, at 7:15 when I was getting ready for work. Unfortunately (in a way), my boss called right at that moment to tell me not to come in...weather issues for the third week in a row. So I didn't get a shot of the dozen or more (I only counted the ones on the holly) robins finishing off the berries left behind by yesterday's bluebirds.

The second "event" was a confirmation--that song sparrows are using the brush pile at the back of the yard as either roosting or hunting territory. I couldn't get the picture, but watched (with binoculars) for several minutes as the little guy made his way towards his pile, scoped out who might be watching and then slipped into the middle of it.

Event number three was the spotting of a

hermit thrush

. I initially thought he was a wood thrush, but a quick check at the Cornell Lab let me know that he wasn't nearly blotchy enough and furthermore, wasn't to be found in this area in winter. The links for "similar species" pulled up the hermit thrush. 

The fourth (and final) event has to do with Rufus. He has been putting up with a lot of rude comments from the area songbirds. Titmice were the first to call the alarm, and they were at it again today. They shared this duty with bluebirds, today. After a while they moved on--probably to go do some more chowing down--only to be replaced 15 minutes later by white-breasted nuthatches and goldfinches! Rufus had been sticking his head out of his roosting box--with his eyes closed, mind you--at 3:00 in the afternoon. Presumably it was either too noisy to sleep, or he didn't get a really good dinner last night and was hungry.

Posting my checklists to the

GBBC

site was easy and quick--it was fun to research the maps and data and see other checklists from Brevard. North Carolina has a long way to go to catch up with reporting being done by people in California, Florida and Texas. 'Course, I reckon we don't have that level of population, either. Regardless, it was easy and fun to do.

Thanks for reading!

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